Libertarian thought in nineteenth century Britain
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Libertarian thought in nineteenth century Britain freedom, equality, and authority by William Russell McKercher

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Published by Garland Pub. in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Great Britain

Subjects:

  • Libertarianism -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th century.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesLibertarian thought in 19th century Britain.
StatementWilliam R. McKercher.
SeriesPolitical theory and political philosophy
Classifications
LC ClassificationsJC599.G7 M38 1987
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 372 p. ;
Number of Pages372
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2732841M
ISBN 10082400826X
LC Control Number86027028

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  As a continuation of the older tradition of classical liberalism, libertarian thinking draws on a rich body of thought and scholarship. Contemporary libertarian scholars are continuing that tradition by making substantial contributions to such fields as philosophy, jurisprudence, economics, evolutionary psychology, political theory, and history, in both academia and politics.1/5(3). In Great Britain the Whigs had evolved by the midth century into the Liberal Party, whose reformist programs became the model for liberal political parties throughout ls propelled the long campaign that abolished Britain’s slave trade in and slavery itself throughout the British dominions in The liberal project of broadening the franchise in Britain bore fruit in. books based on votes: Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand, by George Orwell, The Road to Serfdom by Friedrich A. Hayek, The Law by Frédéric Bastiat. The fact is that the concept of the “state” as presented in some modern libertarian writing owes much more to 19th century German ideas than to the 18th century Anglo-American legacy. In 18th century Britain, the question of whether ministers owed obedience to the .

  The fifty books on this list were all published more than a hundred years ago, and yet remain fresh and exhilarating reads. There’s a temptation, of course, to mutter the names Dickens, Tolstoy, and Twain and assume you’ve covered the 19th century—but a deeper dive proves the novel was alive and well in the s. This book succeeds as both a cultural history of left-libertarian thought in Britain and an application of that history to current politics. The author argues that a recovered anarchist tradition could—and should—be a touchstone for contemporary political radicals. the dominant ideology of the second half of the nineteenth century. The most popular book of libertarian economics in the 20th century, Henry Hazlitt’s Economics in One Lesson, is a contemporary updating of Bastiat’s approach of looking at the secondary and. A number of new books on libertarianism and related issues have come out recently or should be in print soon. If you are interested in libertarianism, these books may well be of interest to you.

For example, I am currently editing a book that is concerned with the philosophy and history of capture theory, a major libertarian doctrine. Much of the most influential evidence on this topic was first offered in Gabriel Kolko’s books The Triumph of Conservatism () and Railroads and Regulation (), where he used the term “political. Classical liberalism is a political ideology and a branch of liberalism that advocates civil liberties under the rule of law with an emphasis on economic y related to economic liberalism, it developed in the early 19th century, building on ideas from the previous century as a response to urbanization and to the Industrial Revolution in Europe and North America.   This book succeeds as both a cultural history of left-libertarian thought in Britain and an application of that history to current politics. The author argues that a recovered anarchist tradition could—and should—be a touchstone for contemporary political s: 2.   Abolitionism was also always a preeminent political cause of liberalism, extending from 18th-century statesman Charles James Fox to the 19th century’s Richard Cobden in Great Britain and strongly influencing such figures as William Lloyd Garrison, Lysander Spooner, and Frederick Douglass in the United States.